CCB701 BIOC701 Syllabus

CCB701/BIOC701 Biochemical and Oncogenic Signaling

Time: Tuesday/Thursday, 10:00-11:20 AM
Location: HSCN 3050 (Physiology & Pharmacology conference room)
Course Coordinator: Dr. Jun Liu junliu@hsc.wvu.edu

Course Goals

This course is designed for the advanced graduate student. The course will focus on the principles that define the biochemical signaling mechanisms employed by all cells, including cancer cells. Students will also develop an understanding of the contemporary research literature in signaling networks relevant to biochemistry and cancer biology.

Block I. RECEPTOR SIGNALING (Week 1-5, block leaders: Ruppert/Agazie)

Week 1-2. Signaling by Receptor Tyrosine Kinase (RTK) - The objective of this section is to understand the structure, function, regulation, and signaling of receptor tyrosine kinases in normal cells, and mechanisms related to their dysregulation in cancer cells. There will be two lectures and two articles for discussion. These two weeks will focus on structure and activation of TRKs including EGFR, IR, PDGFR, MET, TrkA, Eph and Axl, formation of multiprotein signaling complex, downstream signal pathways, and regulation of RTK signaling.
Mike Ruppert and Yehenew Agazie August 19 and 21; August 26 and 28

Week 3-4. Signaling by Cytokine Receptors (CRs) - The objective of this section is to understand the structure, function, regulation, and signaling of CRs in normal cells, and mechanisms related to their dysregulation in cancer cells. There will be two lectures and two articles for discussion. These two weeks will focus on structure of EpoR, IL-R, TGF-R and GH-R.
Mike Ruppert and Yehenew Agazie September 2 and 4; September 9 and 11

Week 5. G Protein-coupled Receptors (GPCRs) - week 5 will illustrate the role of 7-transmembrane receptors (7-TM receptors) and their downstream signaling components in transformation and growth dysregulation.
David Siderovski September 16 and 18

Block II. RAS AND MAPK (Week 6-8, block leaders: Riedel/Liu)

Week 6-8 will illustrate how intracellular signaling molecules are organized in response to extracellular stimulation in normal cell and cancer cells. Specific topics in this block include Ras superfamily GTPases, MAP kinases, PI3 kinase and PTEN.

Week 6. PI3 Kinase and PTEN
Heimo Riedel and Jun Liu September 23 and 25

Week 7. Ras Superfamily GTPases
Heimo Riedel and Jun Liu September 30 and October 2

Week 8. MAP Kinases
Hari Bahudhanapati October 7 and 9

Exam 1 (October 13-17)

Block III. SIGNALING IN DEVELOPMENT (Week 9-11, block leaders: Mathers/Ivanov)

Week 9-11 will follow extracellular signaling factors from their activation of receptors to their transcriptional readouts in the nucleus, including their roles in normal development and cancer progression. The specific pathways to be discussed are- Wnt/beta-catenin, Hedgehog, and Notch signaling.

Week 9. Wnt
Peter Mathers and Alexey Ivanov October 21 and 23

Week 10. Hedgehog
Peter Mathers and Alexey Ivanov October 28 and 30

November 4 General Election Day

Week 11. Notch
Peter Mathers and Alexey Ivanov November 6

Block IV. SIGNALING VIA OTHER MEMBRANE PERMEABLE LIGANDS (Week 12-14, block leaders: Salati/Vona-Davis)

Week 12. The Steroid Hormone Receptor Super Family - The objective of this topic is to understand the commonalities and differences amongst the members of the steroid hormone superfamily of receptors. Actions of estrogens, androgens, vitamins and lipids as ligands for these receptors and their intracellular actions will be considered in detail.
Lisa Salati and Linda Vona-Davis November 11 and 13

Week 13. Cellular Regulation via mTOR and AMPK Pathways - The objective of this topic is to learn the essential role of mTOR and AMPK signaling in cellular function and the molecular mechanisms involved in growth control and disease by these pathways. Consideration will be given to the role of this pathway in cell survival and metabolic regulation.
Lisa Salati and Linda Vona-Davis November 18 and 20

November 24-28 Thanksgiving recess

Week 14. Cellular Regulation via mTOR and AMPK Pathways (continue from Week 13)
Lisa Salati and Linda Vona-Davis December 2 and 4

Exam 2 (December 8-12)

Attendance policy

Attendance is mandatory for the lecture, and active participation in the paper discussion is part of the final grade. Students should contact the professor scheduled to lecture and the course coordinator when an excused absence is necessary.

Participation in paper discussions

Students are required to participate in the discussion of assigned scientific papers each week. Class participation will count 20% of the grades. Faculty members will oversee the paper discussions and will be responsible for the progress of the discussion. Students should demonstrate thorough familiarity with the paper. Contributions to the discussion include descriptions of the methodology, data, results, conclusions and significance of the paper presented. Contributions to the discussion should be accurate, logical and contribute to the progress of the discussion. Students will be expected to respond thoughtfully to ideas and questions from the faculty member and other students. These discussions can also be used to address questions to the faculty members to gain a further understanding of the methods and concepts described in the assigned papers.

Inclusivity Statement

The West Virginia University community is committed to creating and fostering a positive learning andworking environment based on open communication, mutual respect, and inclusion.