Consultation Team

A photo of Patrick Kerr.

Patrick L. Kerr, PhD

West Virginia University
Position
Associate Professor, Behavioral Medicine & Psychiatry
Phone
304-388-1000
A photo of Jessica Luzier.

Jessica L. Luzier, PhD, ABPP

West Virginia University
Position
Associate Professor, Behavioral Medicine & Psychiatry
Phone
304-388-1000
A photo of Laura Wilhelm.

Laura Wilhelm, PhD

West Virginia University
Position
Assistant Professor, Behavioral Medicine & Psychiatry
Phone
304-388-1000
A photo of Carol Freas.

Carol D. Freas, MD

West Virginia University
Position
Assistant Professor, Behavioral Medicine & Psychiatry
Phone
304-388-1000
A photo of Tiffany Sparks.

Tiffany O. Sparks, MD

West Virginia University
Position
Assistant Professor, Behavioral Medicine & Psychiatry
Phone
304-388-1000

Current Intern Team Members:

Jessica Nasser, M.S.

Why I do DBT:
Research has repeatedly shown that Dialectical Behavioral Therapy (DBT) significantly helps individuals who struggle with living, interpersonal, and emotional difficulties. I appreciate the opportunity to use DBT to help patients engage in behaviors that are driven by individual values and experience life in a way that is personally fulfilling and meaningful.

Allen M. Rosenthal, M.S,

Bio:
Allen M. Rosenthal graduated from University of Utah in 2006 with a bachelor’s degree in psychology. He completed his master’s degree in psychology at Northwestern University in Evanston, IL in 2010; he is presently finalizing his doctoral dissertation. Allen is a clinical psychology intern in the WVU Department of Behavioral Medicine at CAMC in Charleston, WV.

Since 2008, Allen has treated anxiety and mood disorders using cognitive-behavioral interventions (CBT). He also practices evidence-based problem-centered integrative psychotherapy for various other disorders and problems of living.

Why I do DBT:
I do DBT because numerous scientific studies have shown that it can substantially help people who are suffering with serious psychological distress and related problematic behaviors. DBT can be especially helpful for people who believe that their situation or prognosis is hopeless. I believe there is hope for everyone; DBT is an important method through which some people improve their lives. I am grateful for the opportunity to practice DBT because it allows me to help people create a fulfilling life by developing and mindfully practicing skills that reduce distress, increase emotional stability, and improve the quality of their relationships.

Briana McElfish, M.A.