About Us

Always aimed at providing the highest quality of care to the patients and service to the referring physicians, the staff of the CAI delivers imaging services rapidly and efficiently, Exams are read and interpreted by the radiology faculty of West Virginia University. The faculty is composed entirely of qualified board-certified physicians with advanced training in their respective areas. The MRI and PET/CT technologists are qualified and board-certified. Continuing education is a high priority with both in-house and external learning offered for the technologists. Imaging services are provided for patients throughout the state of West Virginia and bordering regions in Ohio, Maryland, Kentucky, Virginia, and Pennsylvania. Accurate results are provided to the referring physicians as quickly as possible.Always aimed at providing the highest quality of care to the patients and service to the referring physicians, the staff of the CAI delivers imaging services rapidly and efficiently, Exams are read and interpreted by the radiology faculty of West Virginia University.  The faculty is composed entirely of qualified board-certified physicians with advanced training in their respective areas.  The MRI and PET/CT technologists are qualified and board-certified.  Continuing education is a high priority with both in-house and external learning offered for the technologists.  Imaging services are provided for patients throughout the state of West Virginia and bordering regions in Ohio, Maryland, Kentucky, Virginia, and Pennsylvania.

The American College of Radiology (ACR) has awarded the MRI and PET/CT programs in the Center a three-year term of accreditation after a lengthy evaluation process carried out by nationally recognized leaders in the specialty of Radiology.  The ACR awards accreditation to facilities for the achievement of high practice standards after a peer-review evaluation of the practice.  They assess the qualifications of the personnel and the adequacy of facility equipment.  Radiological examinations are performed on the five scanners housed in the CAI.  Upgrades ensure that the equipment has all the latest developments included.  Service and preventative maintenance provided by the manufacturers of the equipment guarantees the highest level of performance at all times.

The Department’s research effort (housed in the CAI) is led by Dr. Raymond R. Raylman, Ph.D., Vice-chair for Research.  The research is multi-disciplinary, encompassing contribution from faculty members of the Departments of Radiology, Neurology, Neurosurgery, Physiology, Physics and Engineering.

One of the major focuses of the program is investigation of new imaging methods.  This effort is carried by the Nuclear Medicine Instrumentation Development group led by Ray Raylman and Sasha Stolin.  Their work is focused mainly on the development of new systems to produce positron emission tomography (PET) images.  Devices currently under construction include a dedicated Breast-PET/CT scanner, a pre-clinical PET/MRI scanner and a wearable brain PET scanner.  This group also investigates the development and application of new detection devices such as Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPMs) and methods for effectively controlling the temperature of these devices.  Software development is also a component of the research.  This support group, consisting of Gangadhar Jaliparthi and Pete F. Martone, is engaged in the creation of data acquisition, image reconstruction and system simulation software. 

In addition to the instrumentation research group, the CAI supports a cognitive neurosciences research effort.  Both the normal and diseased brain are studied across spatial scales to develop better screening procedures for central nervous system disorders, and ultimately improve treatment.  Multiple techniques (for example, structural MRI, functional MRI, MR spectroscopy, electrophysiology, and transcranial magnetic stimulation) are employed to understand the functions of the brain and how central nervous system disorders disrupt sensory integration and cognition.  For example, Dr. Marc Haut Ph.D. investigates human memory in normal aging and dementia, as well as the effects of toxins on the brain.  His studies use structural (MRI volumetrics and Diffusion Tensor Imaging) and functional neuroimaging (PET activation and fMRI) in an attempt to examine how structure-function relationships in the brain work together to produce certain behaviors.  Dr. James Lewis Ph.D. is using functional MRI to understand how the brain categorizes and identifies natural environmental sounds.  The long-term goal of this research will likely impact the design of the new generation of intelligent hearing aids.  Dr. Bob Hou, Ph.D. studies tobacco addiction using fMRI.  Finally, Dr. Julie Brefczynski-Lewis, Ph.D. is focused on how compassion meditation training can help relieve stress, especially the stress of difficult interpersonal relations.